Adverse events following HPV vaccination, Alberta 2006-2014

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26921782?utm_content=buffer85a1e&utm_medium=social&utm_source=linkedin.com&utm_campaign=buffer

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 2016 Apr 4;34(15):1800-5. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.02.040. Epub 2016 Feb 26.

Adverse events following HPV vaccination, Alberta 2006-2014.

Liu XC1Bell CA2Simmonds KA3Svenson LW4Russell ML5.

Author information

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In Canada, private purchase of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines has been possible since 2006. In Alberta, Canada, a publicly funded quadrivalent HPV vaccine program began in the 2008/2009 school year. There have been concerns about adverse events, including venous thromboembolism (VTE) associated with HPV vaccines. We describe the frequencies of adverse events following HPV vaccination among Alberta females aged 9 years or older and look at VTE following HPV vaccination.

METHODS:

We used the Alberta Immunization and Adverse Reaction to Immunization (Imm/ARI) repository (publicly funded vaccine), the population-based Pharmaceutical Information Network (PIN) information system (dispensing of a vaccine), and the Alberta Morbidity and Ambulatory Care Abstract reporting system (MACAR) for June 1, 2006-November 19, 2014. Deterministic data linkage used unique personal identifiers. We identified all reported adverse events following immunization (AEFI) and all emergency department (ED) utilization or hospitalizations within 42 days of immunization. We calculated the frequency of AEFI by type, rates per 100,000 doses of HPV vaccine administered and the frequencies of ICD-10-CA codes for hospitalizations and emergency department visits.

RESULTS:

Over the period 195,270 females received 528,913 doses of HPV vaccine. Of those receiving at least one dose, 192 reported one or more AEFI events (198 AEFI events), i.e., 37.4/100,000 doses administered (95% CI 32.5-43.0). None were consistent with VTE. Of the women who received HPV vaccine 958 were hospitalized and 19,351 had an ED visit within 42 days of immunization. Four women who had an ED visit and hospitalization event were diagnosed with VTE. Three of these had other diagnoses known to be associated with VTE; the fourth woman had VTE among ED diagnoses but not among those for the hospitalization.

CONCLUSIONS:

Rates of AEFI after HPV immunization in Alberta are low and consistent with types of events seen elsewhere.

Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

*Papillomavirus vaccines/ae [adverse effects]; *Product surveillance; *Vaccination/ae [adverse effects]; Alberta; Canada; HPV vaccination; Humans; Population surveillance; Postmarketing

PMID: 26921782 DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.02.040

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